faitherinhicks:

every. damn. day.

perfect…

faitherinhicks:

every. damn. day.

perfect…

(via racheldukes)


Charcoal drawing of this homeless guy who was harassing a girl playing the violin… yeah…

Charcoal drawing of this homeless guy who was harassing a girl playing the violin… yeah…


comicsalliance:

SPIKE TROTMAN’S ‘LET’S KICKSTART A COMIC’ IS A CRASH COURSE IN CROWDFUNDING SUCCESS
If you’re a ComicsAlliance reader, then there’s a pretty good chance that you’re already familiar with Spike Trotman, especially when it comes to her success on Kickstarter. As the creator of The Sleep of Reason and Poorcraft, Spike’s had Kickstarter success funding her own comics, and as the editor of Smut Peddler, her latest campaign pulled in an overwhelmingly successful $180,000. If anything will make you an expert on how crowdfunding works, that’s the kind of track record that’ll do it.

Now, Spike’s back with her latest comic, Let’s Kickstart A Comic (And Not Screw It Up), featuring harsh truths and solid tips on how to help artists get their own projects off the ground without being financially devastated as a result.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

SPIKE TROTMAN’S ‘LET’S KICKSTART A COMIC’ IS A CRASH COURSE IN CROWDFUNDING SUCCESS

If you’re a ComicsAlliance reader, then there’s a pretty good chance that you’re already familiar with Spike Trotman, especially when it comes to her success on Kickstarter. As the creator of The Sleep of Reason and Poorcraft, Spike’s had Kickstarter success funding her own comics, and as the editor of Smut Peddler, her latest campaign pulled in an overwhelmingly successful $180,000. If anything will make you an expert on how crowdfunding works, that’s the kind of track record that’ll do it.

Now, Spike’s back with her latest comic, Let’s Kickstart A Comic (And Not Screw It Up), featuring harsh truths and solid tips on how to help artists get their own projects off the ground without being financially devastated as a result.

READ MORE


sfcartoonartmuseum:

Cartoon Art Museum Boasts First Annual Queer Comics ExpoSunday, June 8, 2014 from 11am to 5pm
This June, the Cartoon Art Museum of San Francisco will join Pride month celebrations by holding its first annual Queer Comics Expo (QCE) on June 8th from 11am to 5pm. The expo encourages attendees to dress up, draw, meet artists, mingle with Queens, watch demonstrations, join conversations, and learn about the fierce LGBTQ world of comic books. In the past few years the museum has been a successful jumpstart for popular local comic conventions like the Latino Comics Expo and APAture. “Now that the Latino Comics Expo has overflowed the space of the galleries with their success it is time to repeat that victory with something new. The Queer Comics Expo is an event we’ve been waiting to do for a while and we finally have the right team to make it fabulous,” said the events co-coordinator and Cartoon Art Museum Bookstore Manager, Heather Plunkett. The Queer Comics Expo is part of the Queer Cultural Center’s National Queer Arts Festival and will be headlined by local Bay Area comics champion Ed Luce. Ed is beloved for his series Wuvable Oaf and his position as an educator for the California College of the Arts Comics MFA. A former Queer Press Grant Recipient, Ed Luce’s Wuvable Oaf was announced as a new book from Fantagraphics earlier this May. The event also features creators “Along Came Lola” animator and Eisner nominated cartoonist Jett Atwood, Kickstarter success story and writer of “Young Protectors” and Artifice Alex Woolfson,  “Primahood” and former Cartoon Art Museum Small Press Spotlight artist Tyler Cohen, and many more. The Queer Comics Expo will also highlight organizations leading the charge in queer comics like Northwest Press, the premier queer comics publisher and Prism Comics the leading non-profit supporting LGBT comics, creators, and readers with convention appearances and their annual Queer Press Grant. To spice things up the expo will also feature “Super Drag Queens” to mingle with attendees and prizes for the best cosplay! Tickets are for the QCE are included with admission to the Cartoon Art Museum, $8 for the general public/$6 for students and senior citizens, and are available at the door and in advance from the Queer Cultural Center.  Attendees of the Queer Comics Expo will also receive a 10% discount at the Cartoon Art Museum’s bookstore. Updates for QCE, other events and current exhibits at the Cartoon Art Museum at www.cartoonart.org.

sfcartoonartmuseum:

Cartoon Art Museum Boasts First Annual Queer Comics Expo
Sunday, June 8, 2014 from 11am to 5pm

This June, the Cartoon Art Museum of San Francisco will join Pride month celebrations by holding its first annual Queer Comics Expo (QCE) on June 8th from 11am to 5pm. The expo encourages attendees to dress up, draw, meet artists, mingle with Queens, watch demonstrations, join conversations, and learn about the fierce LGBTQ world of comic books. In the past few years the museum has been a successful jumpstart for popular local comic conventions like the Latino Comics Expo and APAture.
 
“Now that the Latino Comics Expo has overflowed the space of the galleries with their success it is time to repeat that victory with something new. The Queer Comics Expo is an event we’ve been waiting to do for a while and we finally have the right team to make it fabulous,” said the events co-coordinator and Cartoon Art Museum Bookstore Manager, Heather Plunkett.
 
The Queer Comics Expo is part of the Queer Cultural Center’s National Queer Arts Festival and will be headlined by local Bay Area comics champion Ed Luce. Ed is beloved for his series Wuvable Oaf and his position as an educator for the California College of the Arts Comics MFA. A former Queer Press Grant Recipient, Ed Luce’s Wuvable Oaf was announced as a new book from Fantagraphics earlier this May.
 
The event also features creators “Along Came Lola” animator and Eisner nominated cartoonist Jett Atwood, Kickstarter success story and writer of “Young Protectors” and Artifice Alex Woolfson,  “Primahood” and former Cartoon Art Museum Small Press Spotlight artist Tyler Cohen, and many more.
 
The Queer Comics Expo will also highlight organizations leading the charge in queer comics like Northwest Press, the premier queer comics publisher and Prism Comics the leading non-profit supporting LGBT comics, creators, and readers with convention appearances and their annual Queer Press Grant.
 
To spice things up the expo will also feature “Super Drag Queens” to mingle with attendees and prizes for the best cosplay!
 
Tickets are for the QCE are included with admission to the Cartoon Art Museum, $8 for the general public/$6 for students and senior citizens, and are available at the door and in advance from the Queer Cultural Center.  Attendees of the Queer Comics Expo will also receive a 10% discount at the Cartoon Art Museum’s bookstore.
 
Updates for QCE, other events and current exhibits at the Cartoon Art Museum at www.cartoonart.org.



#15

oh the famous flour sack exercise.. poor little guy, wonder what’s gonna happen behind those doors..

#15

oh the famous flour sack exercise.. poor little guy, wonder what’s gonna happen behind those doors..


#14

inspired by http://loveandgraphite.tumblr.com/

#14

inspired by http://loveandgraphite.tumblr.com/


dakotamcfadzean:

"Everything You Can Think of is True" from Other Stories and the Horse You Rode in On (Conundrum Press)

You can order my book of short stories from Conundrum Press, or find it at fine book and comic stores near you.

Amazing story!




#13
Do you ever wonder how chemists know if their experiment worked? Well, one of the most common techniques is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (or NMR). It is very similar to MRI, except nuclei at several frequency can be obtained, and it is very popular, specially amongst synthetic chemists.
This weekend, I slaved away collecting Selective Inversion Recovery (SIR) data. That is, you are able to pinpoint a certain hydrogen (or in my case, another lovely nucleus, fluorine) in your molecule and watch it exchange with others. This occurs if you have two or more distinct nuclei that exchange with each other. 
How does SIR NMR work?
Well, think about it this way. Think about a group of 100 hungry and drunk, maybe high, college students. It is their first week of college, and they are doing the typical freshman crazy shenanigans. So, imagine that out of 100 of these drunk students, about 30 of them have their pants off at a certain time. Now, these can put their pants back on, but even if they put their pants on or take them off there are always 30 of these college students without pants on (why, oh why?). Now imagine if you feed all of the students with pants off at a certain time. These are not hungry anymore, although eventually they will. Because they keep, for some reason, putting their pants on and off, there will be students with pants on who have also been fed (they were fed when their pants were off, because they used to belong to that crazy bunch). If over time you look at the college students who are not hungry with and without pants, you will be able to know at which rate these students take their pants off and put them on. 
Yes, I know, weird analogy, but that’s the only way I could come up with it.

#13

Do you ever wonder how chemists know if their experiment worked? Well, one of the most common techniques is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (or NMR). It is very similar to MRI, except nuclei at several frequency can be obtained, and it is very popular, specially amongst synthetic chemists.

This weekend, I slaved away collecting Selective Inversion Recovery (SIR) data. That is, you are able to pinpoint a certain hydrogen (or in my case, another lovely nucleus, fluorine) in your molecule and watch it exchange with others. This occurs if you have two or more distinct nuclei that exchange with each other. 

How does SIR NMR work?

Well, think about it this way. Think about a group of 100 hungry and drunk, maybe high, college students. It is their first week of college, and they are doing the typical freshman crazy shenanigans. So, imagine that out of 100 of these drunk students, about 30 of them have their pants off at a certain time. Now, these can put their pants back on, but even if they put their pants on or take them off there are always 30 of these college students without pants on (why, oh why?). Now imagine if you feed all of the students with pants off at a certain time. These are not hungry anymore, although eventually they will. Because they keep, for some reason, putting their pants on and off, there will be students with pants on who have also been fed (they were fed when their pants were off, because they used to belong to that crazy bunch). If over time you look at the college students who are not hungry with and without pants, you will be able to know at which rate these students take their pants off and put them on. 

Yes, I know, weird analogy, but that’s the only way I could come up with it.


Hi everyone! I apologize for being MIA and not posting some daily doodles. I have a lot of art I complete over break, but traveling + hospital visits forced me to postpone posting these. I am also on a hard deadline with my research, so that is not helping either. Keep your eyes open for these!


spx:

thinkillustration:

A preview of my new comic “This Wont Last”. I should be posting the whole thing in a few days. 

Flipping sweet.

beautiful art


Q
When you write a script (assuming it's full script and you don't know the artist that well), do you feel more like you're picturing how the pages would ideally look and describing those images, or do you feel more like you're describing the action without actually visualizing anything?
A

mattfractionblog:

of course you’re visualizing things, you have to visualize it all — but i’m trying my best to describe the dramatic beats that propel the story forward in as visual and physical a way possible. I’m carving up my story, using mccloud as a referent, in terms of moment, frame, image, word, and flow. Then thinking — still with mccloud — of moment, action, subject, scene, aspect, or a non-sequitor to close the beat and push forward. That isn’t to say I’m NOT talking about the pictures — but rather that I’m trying to move the story along in a sequence of images that, when conjoined with text (or lack of text), create the whole shape of the thing. in an ideal world you’re reducing to the essential. if there’s a single panel on a page that can be removed and the whole of the nuanced story can still be understood, you’ve got dead space and slack. even saying, okay, “biggest shot on the page” starts to frame thing in an artist’s mind. they might could read that and think, okay, this is the peak of this particular page, so if i draw it like X, then… then what does this do to the lead-in panels, and how do we get out of it, and if i need to see Y in the last panel so the first panel of the NEXT page makes sense, could I stage it… 

and on and on.

if you’re alan moore you can write whatever the fuck you want but, i’m telling you, nobody’s alan moore anymore. 

SEX CRIMINALS is a notable exception because so much of that is about timing but, as i’m wrapping the first “volume” tonight, I’m already starting to wonder what the next wave of scripts will be — how well do chip and i know each other now, do we keep on keepin’ on or change it up? 

Priceless


#11/12
This one took forever. I have other pages inked but not yet colored or lettered. Can you tell where this story is going?

#11/12

This one took forever. I have other pages inked but not yet colored or lettered. Can you tell where this story is going?